Our 50 Leading Lights

In a period of uncertainty and rapid change, leaders come under pressure to be strong and do 'what is needed'. Today's political and business climate is just such a time and in response, we are seeing a resurgence of debate over what delivers effective leadership in a fragile environment. Kindness is a concept in the fray of this battle. Kindness builds trust, confidence and loyalty. But it can also be seen as soft; a 'nice to have' but not essential.
Leaders are not the only ones in this debate. As technology and data create transparency and empower consumers, employees, regulators and investors alike, so we all have a say in the style of leadership that we want to see succeed. With this inaugural kindness list, we aim to showcase that kindness is not only a nice to have, but does indeed deliver 'what is needed', with results determined not only by a short-term sprint, but by the long-term marathon.

Valeria Locatelli

Audit Director, M&G Investments

Valeria is Audit Director at M&G Investments and a member of the Executive Committee. She is a key driver of the diversity and inclusion agenda she is the M&G Executive Sponsor for diversity and inclusion and sits on the D&I Advisory Committee at a Prudential Group level. Her passion to ensure that everyone can bring their whole selves to work is fully demonstrated by her actions she is Co-executive Sponsor for Mind Matters, the employee-led mental health awareness network, and she has built a culture within her team that drives collaboration, celebrates success and encourages all members to develop to their full potential. Valeria also wants to help others across the industry as a whole and, to this end, founded the Audit Book Club, an initiative that seeks to encourage individuals from within the industry to be their best selves. Valeria is often asked to speak at both internal and external events, sharing her experience of cultural and gender equality issues.

Why is kindness essential for a leader in today’s world?
Kindness is about being open to the needs of others, respecting them and enabling their fulfilment. Businesses are about people: in today’s world, where technology seems to have taken over, it is essential to go back to the skill of facilitating and strengthening human interaction.
Can you give us one example of kindness in leadership making a significant impact?
Kindness requires courage and strength. Delivering difficult messages while maintaining a level head, a supportive approach and empathetic language is the difference between alienating and disengaging individuals and compelling them to change. Kindness is a great enabler of lasting success and a self-fulfilling cycle of development.

Suzie de Rohan Willner

CEO, TOAST

Suzie is the CEO of TOAST, a fashion and lifestyle brand renowned for its contemporary design. Suzie is an inspirational leader with a great passion for developing high-performing, innovative teams who can act nimbly and boldly in a competitive landscape. She has a proven track record of turning companies around and building positive workplaces including FitFlop, Timberland, Dockers and Levi Strauss. For all those who work with Suzie, it is abundantly clear that she values kindness, the wellbeing of her team and a supportive environment above all else. There is no traditional ‘hierarchy’ at TOAST; meetings are fair and supportive; everyone is allowed and encouraged to share their opinions and ideas, and there is business transparency and openness. Suzie develops meaningful relationships with her team, recognising each person’s strengths and helping them to develop and grow in these areas. She encourages everyone around her to be their ‘best self’, pushing them almost invisibly to reach their potential and it’s this potential that impacts so significantly on the success of business itself.

Why is kindness essential for a leader in today’s world?
Companies that embed a culture of kindness are able to foster dynamic, positive communities of people who enjoy working for their organisations. We live in a hectic, fast paced world – if leaders can spread kindness, both in their approach to work and maintaining the health and wellbeing of their employees – then it will be a better environment for us all.
In your experience, how does kindness make business sense?
When kindness is embedded within a business culture each individual flourishes and both creativity & productivity increase. The younger generation are increasingly particular about the brands and organisations they work for. To attract the best, it is important that values of kindness – and not greed – are intrinsic in a companies make up, and this must start at the top.
Can you give us one example of kindness in leadership making a significant impact?
Kind leaders, who give their time can affect the lives of the individuals working for them, giving them the confidence to take the next step. It might seem small, but over a whole career, one leader can make a significant impact.

Stephen Boyes

Managing Director, EMEA Market Development, Refinitiv

Steve leads the EMEA Market Development function for Refinitiv, responsible for generating over $2bn revenues by helping financial professionals succeed faster than the pace of change and better manage their governance, risk and compliance challenges. Integral to his leadership role, Steve chairs the Refinitiv Diversity and Inclusion Council which aims to ensure an inclusive, collaborative workplace where potential is realised. Steve also sits on the Corporate Executive Board SEC as a ‘sales guru’ where industry-wide best practices are identified and developed. Steve’s mantra for success is: play; be there; make their day, and choose your attitude. He has been with Thomson Reuters (now, Refinitiv) for over 20 years and has developed deep and long-lasting relationships with the people with whom he works. He cares for so much more than just the financial results as an example, Steve recently worked with a junior team member to honour a man in his eighties, the oldest working user of a Thomson Reuters financial desktop product. Steve arranged for an iconic City of London photo to be taken, framed and signed for the user. These are the acts of kindness that speak louder than words to his team, colleagues and all those who are lucky to work with him.

Why is kindness essential for a leader in today’s world?
In a world of artificial intelligence and machine learning, the machine and human combined are the most accurate combination.
In your experience, how does kindness make business sense?
Kindness is at the heart of what makes the business world prevail, the family prosper and individuals grow.
Can you give us one example of kindness in leadership making a significant impact?
In simple terms there are two types of people in this world: those you want to help and those you don’t or feel indifferent about. Meeting people you want to help in business (and personal life) is where the magic happens. People buy from people first, companies second and products third.

Sean Tompkins

CEO, RICS

Sean is CEO of the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS), the leading global professional body in the built and natural environment. He leads a global team of 900 employees, located across 30 countries. Sean’s range of skills and attributes bring together sound business acumen with a strong commitment to pursuing the public interest. He is helping to build a global profession that will provide standards and ethical practice in real estate and land markets, which account for 70% of global wealth. He leads by example, placing great emphasis on people and culture, whether it be the importance he places on feedback, his expectations of an inclusive workplace or the way in which he spends half of his leadership meetings focusing on people and culture, and the other half on performance and planning. He sees people as the most important component of a successful organisation and he invests so much time in engagement, listening, consulting, mentoring and making sure he is an enabler. He is a shining light when it comes to women’s empowerment, enabling RICS to actively encourage women into promotion and leadership roles. Over and above all else, Sean’s ambition, enthusiasm and evident enjoyment of his work are infectious and he makes people want to succeed.

Why is kindness essential for a leader in today’s world?
Most of the biggest challenges facing the world today are not matters that can be resolved by any one person, organisation or institution. Collaboration is key to success and human kindness is at the heart of a collaborative society.
In your experience, how does kindness make business sense?
The productivity of our people is fundamentally essential to business success. Businesses that have kindness in their DNA are concerned about the overall well-being of their people. People respond to businesses that care and enhance their well-being, and productivity follows as a result.

Sarah Deaves

UK Wealth Director, Lloyds Banking Group

Sarah has responsibility for Lloyds Banking Group’s most valuable personal client relationships as well as advisors who give personal financial planning advice to any eligible customer of Lloyd’s, Bank of Scotland and Halifax. Sarah previously worked at RBS as Managing Director, Private Banking & Advice and at Coutts & Co where she was the first female Chief Executive. As Co-chair of Breakthrough, the largest gender diversity network in the UK with over 15,000 members, Sarah has played a huge part in setting the strategy and direction of the network. Sarah is a great example of somebody who leads with her own actions. As a kind, authentic and welcoming leader, she creates an environment where her wider team feel empowered to be themselves in the workplace and can thereby give their very best. She is not afraid to break down hierarchy and is always willing to get involved with tasks to support her teams, truly embodying the ‘leading by doing’ ethos. Sarah believes in helping everyone – she invests so much time in mentoring her team, her colleagues, graduates and interns.

Why is kindness essential for a leader in today’s world?
Kindness is about treating people with respect and as individuals, both of these are fundamental to building a more inclusive and diverse team which in turn delivers better business.

In your experience, how does kindness make business sense?
Treating people with kindness does not mean shirking difficult messages - it is about approaching people with humanity. This creates a better more agile team able to face challenges and uncertainty, capabilities which are so important in today’s changing business world.
Can you give us one example of kindness in leadership making a significant impact?
I think it is important that we make the workplace more human and connected. For me, remembering the little personal details about individuals, as well as adapting how we do things to accommodate differences helps to ensure everyone is comfortable bringing their ‘whole’ self to work. This inclusivity give everyone more space to operate at their best.

Sam McAlister

Interviews Editor, BBC

After a successful career as a barrister, Sam joined the BBC in 2002. She has worked in a number of roles including reporter and producer on many high profile stories and programmes. For the past eight years, Sam has been a senior interviews editor with Britain’s leading current affairs programme, Newsnight. Kindness, empathy and a fierce passion for social justice are the hallmarks of Sam’s professional style. Across all teams, Sam takes special care of new starters and ensures team members have the emotional and intellectual support they need to succeed. She creates an atmosphere in which people feel valued, supported and cared for. Whilst at the BBC, Sam has been involved in choosing work experience candidates and has made it her personal mission to support these individuals, and many others, throughout their careers. She also volunteers for the BBC mentoring program and firmly places diversity and inclusion on the agenda, in all that she does. Sam helps run two primary schools and serves as a governor, working with the most socially deprived children in London and their families.

 

Why is kindness essential for a leader in today’s world?
Leadership is a privilege and how you conduct it affects a lot of people – not just your employees but their friends and family too. Kindness is an essential part of ensuring that their workplace is somewhere they look forward to going, rather than dread.
In your experience, how does kindness make business sense?
As a leader, a happy team is more likely to be loyal, productive and stay around. They will also be a great advert for the company when people ask what it’s like.
Can you give us one example of kindness in leadership making a significant impact?
I spent a lot of time with a brilliant young woman, who was a single parent and who came for work experience. With her talent, and my understanding of what was needed and the formalities, she finally got on to the BBC scheme she’d applied to for six years in a row. Two lives changed for the better – hers for the opportunity and mine for the joy on her face when she found out.

Sally Waterston

Founder, Waterstons

Sally is the Founder of Waterstons, an IT and business consultancy. She has always been on the board of directors at Waterstons, most notably as Customer Service Director and has more recently stepped into the role of Chairperson. As well as mentoring within her own organisation, Sally has been a mentor for the Prince’s Trust, and is currently a mentor at the East Durham Employability Trust. Sally set out to create a business that would put clients and employees first, rather than a company being driven solely by profit. Her ‘people first’ value is about seeing the human element in everything, from employees attending their child’s first sports day to client relationships. She is brilliant listener she will tell you what you need to hear rather than what you want to hear but will do so with kindness and compassion. Acts of kindness are her hallmark with one example being that she knows when each of her 150 employees celebrate a birthday and she goes out of her way to give them something they will love.

Why is kindness essential for a leader in today’s world?
There is never justification for being unkind or disrespectful in any area of life and business. For example, if someone is not performing well at work we should separate legitimate judgement of their performance and behaviour from judging them as people. None of us has the right to feel ‘better’ than anyone else.

Sally Clark

Chief Internal Auditor, Barclays

Sally is one of the most senior women at Barclays, leading a global internal audit function of 650 employees. Her ability to influence from the most senior executive level to the most junior, across the company is significant. Demonstrating incredible leadership, Sally’s impact is driven by her openness, honesty and enthusiasm – ‘what you see really is what you get’ with Sally Clark. She believes that effective, high-performing teams are built on trust, mutual respect and, most importantly, by enabling individuals to bring their whole selves to work. On arrival at Barclays her first internal audit conference had dedicated sessions on ‘bringing your whole self to work’. Only two years later and her team’s employee engagement scores were the highest across the Group. Sally has established a ‘reverse mentor’ programme at Barclays and she champions the diversity and inclusivity agenda, encouraging colleagues to find innovative ways to focus and promote it. She is also the ExCo sponsor of the Barclays Be Well agenda and a sponsor of the internal diversity network, Emerge.

Why is kindness essential for a leader in today’s world?
Increasingly today young people are looking for something different from leaders. In particular, something that accords with their own values. So, as the workforce is made up of more and more young people, leaders need to respond to this. It doesn’t replace the more traditional attributes of a leader but it is a vital addition.
In your experience, how does kindness make business sense?
People remember acts of kindness – they hold in our memory and can have a huge impact on how we feel about the person who acted with kindness. As such, kindness can engender loyalty from customers and from colleagues.

Saker Nusseibeh

CEO, Hermes Investment Management

Saker was appointed acting CEO of Hermes Investment Management in 2011 and later confirmed as CEO in 2012. Today, Hermes is a completely different company to what it was in 2011 and this is credited to Saker, his vision, leadership, passion and unyielding belief that Hermes is a harbinger of change for the industry. An inspirational leader internally and externally, Saker has been a vanguard, advocating that the end beneficiary, the hundreds of thousands of pensioners on whose behalf Hermes is investing, should be at the front of the fund management industry’s mind at all times. Saker strongly advocates that environmental, social and governance integration and stewardship add value and provide positive returns for investors as well as society, and he has made it clear that the work carried out by Hermes Investment Management is to help people invest better, retire better and to create a better society for all. In 2015, Saker established the Hermes Pledge, now taken by every staff member, that reflects the values of respect, transparency and responsibility and makes kindness integral to the Hermes culture DNA.

Why is kindness essential for a leader in today’s world?
Kindness is the halo that reflects our humanity – a leader that lacks kindness is incomplete, and therefore not qualified to be a true leader.
In your experience, how does kindness make business sense?
Most business is about the interaction of human beings. Kindness brings the best out of people – it glues teams together, creates a better stakeholder approach to business issues and engenders sustainability.
Can you give us one example of kindness in leadership making a significant impact?
Graham taking on Buffet; the support of some growth managers for Grantham in the late 1990s; the impactful spend of the wealthy Pittsburgh families in local businesses, universities and infrastructure that helped revive the town and propel it to become an IT rather than part of the rust belt.

Sacha Romanovitch

CEO, Grant Thornton

Sacha is CEO of Grant Thornton, leading 42,000 employees across 130 countries. She is also on the UK National Advisory Board on Impact Investing; the Prime Minister’s Business Advisory Council, and the board of London & Partners. She is the first female boss of a top City accounting firm, with an ambition to change the culture of professional services as a whole. Under her leadership, Grant Thornton partners voted by over 95% to share profits among the whole team, not just the partnership a significant step away from the traditional partnership model. She injects purpose into business and this affects everything from decisions on the clients Grant Thornton works with to the way in which those clients are cared for. Grant Thornton’s culture is fast becoming a beacon for those who value enterprise as a way to achieve positive impact in the world. Sacha is generous with her time, and brings a clarity of thought that inspires and helps others around her. When asked what trait she most dislikes in others, Sasha answered: ‘Unkindness… if we all made a little more effort to be kinder, the world would be a much better place’.

Why is kindness essential for a leader in today’s world?
Kindness is being friendly, generous, considerate. These qualities seems essential to navigating through a world facing complex challenges and bringing out the best in ourselves and those around us to work together to address them.
In your experience, how does kindness make business sense?
Great business is about understanding the challenges and opportunities at a human level as well as a macro level. Building deep relationships that are founded on trust. Showing you care, giving rather than taking - those seem to be at the heart to trust. Kindness matters.
Can you give us one example of kindness in leadership making a significant impact?
Kindness in leadership is not expresses in grand gestures, it is in the moment to moment actions we choose. Noticing a colleague, taking the time to speak with them, checking in and remembering what is going on in their lives. These moments create a culture that create a place people choose to be. The small moments have a bigger impact than many of us realise.

Ruth Shaw

General Manager, The Premier League Charitable Fund

Ruth is the General Manager of the Premier League Charitable Fund, one of the biggest sports charities in the world, with an annual budget in excess of £35m. Prior to this role, Ruth held senior roles in government, most recently heading up the flagship Soft Power initiative at the Foreign Office. She is a passionate champion of gender equality and has made incredible efforts to promote this institutionally in each organisation in which she has worked. Ruth set up TedX Whitehall Women and, in the male-dominated world of football, she mentors a number of aspiring young women, also serving on the board of Women in Football. At the very heart of Ruth’s leadership approach is kindness. This includes taking a genuine interest in people; coaching and supporting those around her to help them achieve their potential and celebrating their success. Ruth’s leadership style is deft, she is firm but kind and is always calm and generous. She speaks truth to power when needed a hugely important attribute in charitable and public service and she leads by example, creating working environments where staff feel engaged, valued and supported, thereby creating and sustaining high-performing teams.

Why is kindness essential for a leader in today’s world?
Kindness comes in all different shapes and forms, from noticing when someone is struggling, to celebrating an achievement and saying thank you. It’s often as simple as making time for people. The best leaders always make you feel like they have time for you, no matter how busy they are or how much is going on.
In your experience, how does kindness make business sense?
Kindness is about making connections, taking time to speak to people, understanding their motivations and taking an interest in others’ perspectives. This all leads to better ideas and better decisions, which makes perfect business sense. Kindness also helps with recruitment, retention and well-being, and happier teams are more productive teams.
Can you give us one example of kindness in leadership making a significant impact?
I think one of the biggest areas is around feedback. Being able to give feedback which is honest and constructive but also kind gives people the best chance to learn and grow. Feedback is wisdom. If you can give feedback with a mindset that suggests sharing wisdom, you can do it in a kind but effective way. I’ve always responded positively to people sharing their experience and wisdom with me, particularly when it comes from a place of generosity and support.

Robin Stevens

Head of Digital & Marketing Services, Aviva Investors

As Head of Digital and Marketing Services, Robin is a consistent source of support for his team and the wider business as he drives deeper digital engagement by making client servicing activities easier to perform, improving efficiency and functionality and in turn delivering the enhanced experience clients expect from a global business. He is a passionate champion of the digital and wider marketing team, known as the ‘go-to’ for many colleagues on subjects ranging from strategy to personal development. He is eager to support his staff’s personal and professional development, encouraging training courses, conferences, work-life balance and the like. Robin has a calm and considered presence, always with a focus on people as well as ways in which to drive the business forward. He has been instrumental in creating a team structured for success, investing time in identifying strengths of each team member and developing the group as a whole. In the words one of Robin’s colleagues, ‘he is always the first to open the door and the last to walk through it’.

 

Why is kindness essential for a leader in today’s world?
I believe kindness, empathy and happiness are particularly important for leaders in today’s very hectic and full on world and these traits genuinely make a difference in the workplace. People perform better in a caring, supportive and happy environment, for a leader who shows a strong sense of purpose and understanding and believes in the wellbeing of their team. You spend so much time at work these days being happy is an essential aspect. Kindness improves relationships, hopefully makes you a better person and I’m sure has many positive health benefits as well.

Rebecca Robins

Chief Culture and Learning Officer, Interbrand

Rebecca has been a catalyst for Interbrand’s focus on learning and development through her dynamic leadership of the Interbrand Academy, a global learning platform and centre of excellence in brands and the business of branding. She has led numerous client engagements, including Interbrand’s luxury practice, working with brands from Burberry to LVMH. From guest lecturing at universities to her role as a board trustee of a social mobility foundation, Rebecca’s commitment to culture and learning runs deep. Rebecca is a member of Omnicom’s Omniwomen Committee and has spoken on culture and diversity in business at leading global conferences such as the New York Times Luxury Summit. Above all, Rebecca has held fast to the belief that brands have the power to change the world – and that begins with people. Indeed many of her colleagues see her leadership as a transformative power, for individuals, teams and the business as a whole.

Why is kindness essential for a leader in today’s world?
Kindness is what it is to be human. In a world spinning inexorably into artificial intelligence and the virtual, what it is to be human matters more than ever. If kindness is not showing up in your business, then you seriously need to question what you're doing and why, and what you value and why. And we need to shift from kindness as an ‘abstract’ to what it means to act with kindness. The phenomenal Ursula Le Guin sums it up powerfully: ‘Words are events, they do things, change things. They transform both speaker and hearer; they feed energy back and forth and amplify it.’
In your experience, how does kindness make business sense?
Leading with kindness is leading with understanding, with empathy, with trust, honesty and transparency. It's supporting people to be their best, in every way, and at every level. It's nurturing culture, it's investing in the human connections in business. So much of what drives a business forward is what we do together. We don’t operate in autonomous silos, we operate as teams, as collectives. It’s simple business sense to invest in where and how the real work gets done. The ‘soft skills’ of business have a major branding problem – I channel Marcus Aurelius when he said sincere kindness is ‘invincible’. Consider the impact on your business when you put into context that kindness is zero tolerance of conflict and toxicity in business. It's showing the love and telling it like it is. It’s about a culture that attracts, retains and motivates talent. Hope is not a thing with feathers – it is something for which we hold a responsibility, as individuals, and as businesses. The game-changer will be about what we do together.
Can you give us one example of kindness in leadership making a significant impact?
There is a new language at Microsoft, under the aegis of CEO Satya Nadella, that’s leading the brand into a new era. The work that he’s led in shifting the business towards a subscription model of products has gone hand-in-hand with investing in culture and people. It’s an era of compassion, empathy, listening and learning. As Nadella says: ‘It’s our ability to work together that makes our dreams believable and, ultimately, achievable’. And as we reflect on kindness in leadership, the last words must go to the late Kofi Annan: ‘Sometimes we must do what is right simply because not to do so would be wrong. And sometimes, we do what is right to help usher in a new day, of new norms and new behaviors’.

Professor Mike Thomas

Vice Chancellor, University of Central Lancashire

Mike is responsible for academic leadership and the smooth running and growth of the £200m+ turnover business. He is a thought leader on compassionate leadership and the co-author of a new book, Kindness in Leadership. After extensive consultation with staff, Mike has pioneered a set of five values by which the university now operates: common sense, compassion, teamwork, attention to detail and trust. These values have embedded kindness into the university’s culture and placed it above the sector average with a recent staff survey showing 93% enjoying their work. In the last 12 months, under Mike’s careful stewardship, the university recorded an operating surplus of £14m+ or 6.7% of turnover. Perhaps the greatest example of Mike’s kindness in leadership: in 2017, Hurricane Irma had a devastating impact on Sint Maarten, where the American University of the Caribbean School of Medicine’s students complete years of medical school. With no power or running water, the university was displaced. Mike reached out and in a few days, 643 students transferred to Preston. The scale of the challenge made this a remarkable achievement and yet another example of Mike’s decisive and yet consultative and collaborative leadership style.

 

Why is kindness essential for a leader in today’s world?
Several reasons; bringing people together on a platform of shared values and principles; engagement of others which encourages multiple approaches to problem solving and more creative approaches to issues, developing a sense of belonging in a shared group; provides a counter weight to selfishness and greed, sustains community coherence and tolerance.
In your experience, how does kindness make business sense?
Research demonstrates that kindness leadership strengthens staff engagement, increases efficiency, effectiveness and raises productivity. It also creates a culture of creativity and shared approaches to sustaining corporate values.
Can you give us one example of kindness in leadership making a significant impact?
The university of Central Lancashire has had kindness values embedded in its ethos in my time as Vice-chancellor and in the last four years has sustained a surplus, has the highest levels of staff engagement and satisfaction in the sector and has a major Regional influence in Lancashire.

Professor Heather McGregor CBE

Executive Dean, Edinburgh Business School

Heather is Executive Dean of Edinburgh Business School. The school has campuses in the UK, Dubai and Malaysia and is a leader in distance-learning, with over 10,000 active students and 21,000 alumni across 166 countries. Heather is also a non-executive director of two public companies and was a founding member of the steering group for the 30% Club. She was awarded a CBE for services to business, with reference to employment skills and diversity in the workplace. She is the Founder of the Taylor Bennett Foundation, an award-winning training and mentoring programme, encouraging black, Asian and ethnic minority graduates to pursue a career in communications. Whilst a powerful and decisive leader, Heather creates an environment where colleagues feel empowered to speak up with ideas and feedback, and are supported to take risks and learn from mistakes or setbacks. She leads by example, working to the highest level of performance whether amongst FTSE CEOs or academic leaders, yet taking time to build relationships at all levels and look after the human side of the business too.

Why is kindness essential for a leader in today’s world?
Kindness can have a positive effect for all stakeholders and can be a way for companies to stand out in a world dominated by transactional relationships. Treating employees with kindness can create a knock-on effect and improve productivity. It is often a quality that is overlooked by businesses focussed on the numbers, but it can be a powerful way to connect with employees and customers.
In your experience, how does kindness make business sense?
It helps retain and recruit talented employees looking for a healthier working environment. Kindness also reduces anxiety, workplace-related stress and improves the general atmosphere. People are much more productive if treated with kindness, stay with you for longer, and tell other people about it which makes it easier to acquire great talent. This can be a crucial differentiator in a highly competitive world.
Can you give us one example of kindness in leadership making a significant impact?
Writing in the week after the terrible tragedy at Leicester City, I am struck by the kindness shown by the late Vichai Srivaddhanaprabha, the Leicester City owner who perished in the helicopter crash. His kindness was the first thing mentioned in the official press release from the Club ‘In Khun Vichai, the world has lost a great man. A man of kindness…’. He showed great kindness not only to the players and staff but also the fans, and made everyone feel like a family. It was not just his money that won Leicester City the Premiership (at odds of 5000–1) in 2016 – if money alone bought Premiership titles then there are several clubs who ought to be making more appearances at the top of the League – but his kindness that enabled everyone to feel they wanted to try their best.

Phil Smith

Former Chief Executive and Current Advisor, Cisco UK & Ireland

Phil served as Chief Executive of Cisco UK & Ireland from 20082016. He has always had a passion for invoking societal change and has been instrumental in building Cisco’s relationships with government, business and academia to help change the way that people work, live, play and learn in the UK. In 2012, he led Cisco in the delivery of the most connected Olympic Games in London. He then spearheaded the legacy programme, committing $5m of investment and an ecosystem for innovation and STEM skills; and a $1bn investment to accelerate digitization in the UK. Phil was Chairman of Cisco UK & Ireland during 2017 and is now an advisor to Cisco’s UK and Ireland Chief Executive. He has made an incredible impact on the culture of the business but also on the thousands of individuals who partake in Cisco’s training programmes and skills initiatives. He is a celebrated mentor, determined to help others achieve their very best and has the ability to galvanise action he founded the Leaderboard Challenge, which has now brought CEOs together from all over the country and raised over £1m for Sports Relief.

Why is kindness essential for a leader in today’s world?
The world is moving at such a pace that it is easy to feel left behind, isolated or out of touch. Sometimes, some thoughtful kindness can help even the most confident of us realise that we are not alone and a helping hand is near.
In your experience, how does kindness make business sense?
If kindness makes sense in our everyday world, it must follow that the same is true in business – there is no distinction and that realisation is key to a more holistic approach to transacting. Why would we be harsher, tougher, less lenient or even unjoyful in our business interactions? It makes no sense! If we operate as our true selves and not some distorted ‘business’ version of our self, we will be liberated and amazed at the kindness chain. It takes less time to be kind – there’s no complicated layered filtering.
Can you give us one example of kindness in leadership making a significant impact?
A CEO of a large retailer was taking a tour of the warehouse; as she sat in the canteen for a lunch break, she noticed that one of the security team who was also taking a break, was rapidly filling in a very difficult cryptic crossword. They got chatting and she learned that the security guard was working shifts that were not helpful to his domestic arrangements and so, with the kindness filter flashing, the CEO thought about trying to improve the situation for him. She knew that she should think about all the practical reasons for not getting involved (best use of her time, HR implications etc.) but kindness won the day and the guard was soon running a complex operation in the import arm of the business that later contributed to the company winning an award for services to enterprise.

Paul Polman

CEO, Unilever

Paul has been CEO of Unilever since 2009. He is responsible for all matters relating to the strategic direction and operational running and performance of the company which operates in 190 countries and serves 2.5 billion consumers a day. He is a visionary business leader who has demonstrated that long-term business growth can and should exist with positive social impact. In 2010, he launched the Unilever Sustainable Living Plan, which at the time was a radical new business model, aiming to decouple growth from environmental impact, while increasing the social impact of the business. Paul has led the diversity and inclusion agenda and today, 45% of Unilever’s non-executive directors and 47% of all Unilever managers are female, up from 38% when Paul joined as CEO. Unilever’s vision is to be the number one employer of choice for people with disabilities by 2025. An example of Paul’s unique leadership style? Everyday Paul writes handwritten notes to people in the business to show his appreciation for their work. Outside of Unilever, Paul runs his own foundation, the Kilimanjaro Blind Trust.

No Question found!

Patrick Olson

Deputy COO, BlackRock

Patrick is the global Deputy COO of BlackRock, coordinating the most strategically important issues and opportunities facing the business globally including product, technology and operations. Amongst many other commitments, Patrick is a member of the EMEA Executive Committee; Corporate Operations Executive Committee; Global Operating Committee and Digital Wealth Executive Committee. Beyond his phenomenal business drive and achievements, Patrick embodies kindness in leadership. He is passionate about encouraging emerging talent and empowering individuals to take emotional ownership of what they do and the firm. He is the executive sponsor of BlackRock’s EMEA Women’s Network, and of BlackRock’s participation in the 30% Club. Receptive to the needs and challenges facing women in the industry, Patrick is a committed mentor and sponsor, determined to help others reach their potential.

Why is kindness essential for a leader in today’s world?
Our lives continue to get more stressed due to demands both personally and professionally. Understanding the demands on individuals and showing some empathy builds tremendous loyalty.
In your experience, how does kindness make business sense?
Kindness is fundamental to building relationships and the most important aspect of business is relationships.
Can you give us one example of kindness in leadership making a significant impact?
One of my best friends and best clients was, in part, developed through an act of kindness. A situation where I helped a friend, and unknowingly made an impression on this person, led to an introduction to one my best clients. Trust is table stakes in any relationship and kindness is one ingredient to trust.

Patricia Brolly

Head of Products, Central Europe, Visa

Patricia is part of Visa’s senior leadership team, managing its core consumer solutions and leading a strategically important growth programme in key European markets. Patricia has led the Women in Business network at Visa since 2015 and seen the network grow both in terms of numbers (from 200 to over 436 members), and profile within the business. Under Patricia’s direction, the Women in Business network has become an influential forum, and an empowering, inspiring and motivating platform that gives members access to tools, services, networking events and knowledge to better themselves in the workplace. Through the network, Patricia has influenced the Mentoring Programme, the Return to Work scheme and the Support Framework for individuals on longer-term leave. Patricia has also been instrumental in increasing Visa’s focus on diversity. She is an exemplary leader with a highly-engaged team due largely to her nurturing approach, clear drive, ambitious nature and a focus that is always on both results and people.

 

Why is kindness essential for a leader in today’s world?
People are not machines – we all have loved ones, responsibilities, and difficult times we go through outside of work. Good companies recognise this and look out for their people through the lows and highs without expecting anything in return. In my experience, the kindest teams have been the best performing teams because they want each and every person in that team to succeed and be happy.

Nigel Prideaux

Group Communications Director, Aviva

Nigel leads the internal and external communications, PR, press, media and reputation teams for Aviva, covering 30,000 colleagues in 15 markets. He is a senior and respected role model and a guiding light externally in his profession and discipline, with his team winning multiple awards year after year. Nigel is relentless in his belief in kindness and leadership and it gets results as can be seen by the exceptional engagement scores of  his team annually. He has the ability to make tough commercial judgements and decisions with kindness and, when considering customers and colleagues, is always asking ‘how would I like to be treated?’. He has a track record of leading in times of crisis and difficulty, both at home and work and, internally, his reputation is as a mentor who will coach with both care and edge.

Why is kindness essential for a leader in today’s world?
My late grandfather – an extraordinarily special man – said to me many years ago that kindness is the single most underrated leadership quality. Kindness is not a soft concept or a weakness. Just the opposite. Kindness is about strength. Kindness is about empathy, listening and putting yourself in the other person’s shoes – preconceptions are often misconceptions. Kindness is about being open and honest with one another – not talking in corridors. Kindness is about having the tough conversations quickly, upfront, fairly and respectfully – challenging poor performance or bad behaviours and not letting things fester. Kindness is certainly not done for show and it must be genuine and authentic – small acts of kindness every day, not ostentatious moments of generosity. Above all, it is about doing to others what you would want others to do to you.
In your experience, how does kindness make business sense?
t’s simple. Kind teams are strong teams and strong teams outperform.
Can you give us one example of kindness in leadership making a significant impact?
If people are valued, they perform better. The challenge with examples of kindness is that they can suggest that kindness can be demonstrated in single moments when true kindness is constant. However, someone’s kindness had a significant impact on me when my sister-in-law, Vanessa, died suddenly in Africa 20 years ago. I was working on a pretty demanding project with Susan Gilchrist at Brunswick at the time. When Susan heard the news, without hesitation and despite the intense nature of the project, she sent me home for the week to support my wife, Clare, and her family. I have never forgotten Susan’s kindness and it has shaped how I hope I can look after others.

Mina Shiraishi

Partner, KPMG

Mina is a Partner in KPMG’s People Services in tax – a practice with 470 employees, responsible for building relationships with potential clients, advising existing clients on tax requirements, and representing KPMG in the market. She is also a Sponsoring Partner of KPMG’s Network of Women, empowering women’s career development and, since taking on this role, has seen membership increase by 20%. Mina’s work on women’s empowerment reaches far beyond KPMG she has recently launched a programme with a FTSE 100 company to develop future female leaders. In 2010, Mina took a career break and volunteered as ambulance crew for St John Ambulance and as a listening volunteer for the Samaritans. When Mina returned to KPMG three years later, she became a Partner, bringing with her all the skills she’d learnt volunteering. She continues to volunteer extensively. As one of the few BAME female partners, Mina mentors several colleagues from under-represented categories. Her intelligent, compassionate leadership delivers real results, with many of her mentees flourishing and powering quickly through the ranks.

Why is kindness essential for a leader in today’s world?
Excelling in their field is no longer sufficient. Great leaders inspire people by showing leadership, caring for others and making a positive impact in the society in which we live.
In your experience, how does kindness make business sense?
Business is under intense scrutiny. Leaders who do not act in a socially responsible manner, will risk alienating their customers.
Can you give us one example of kindness in leadership making a significant impact?
To attract the best talent, people are increasingly choosing employers who treat them with respect and value their individuality.

Melissa Allen

Partner, Financial Services, KPMG

Melissa is a lead partner for KPMG’s finance and risk transformation services, working across the market with large, complex organisations. She is also the Client Lead Partner for the largest bank in the Eurozone, and for the last three years, she has led the UK Risk Consulting practice. In her first leadership role at KPMG, Melissa took on a challenging team situation. Her inclusive leadership style built a culture of trust and positive team spirit, which was later reflected in engagement scores (the most improved across the consulting business) and, importantly, financial results. Melissa is dedicated to KPMG’s LGBT network, Breathe, and believes wholeheartedly that diverse teams are more effective. She is a fantastic mentor and has supported the progression of men and women from graduate trainee level through to partnership level. Melissa is President-Elect of the Junior League of London, a charity working with community partners addressing poverty and driving social mobility. Working part-time at KPMG, Melissa sends a clear message that flexible working is possible, even at the most senior of levels. In all that she does, Melissa ‘pays it forward’, sharing her expertise for the benefit of others and helping to build strong, inclusive and diverse teams and communities.

Why is kindness essential for a leader in today’s world?
In order to lead in today’s global, interconnected world we need to recognise that not everyone is same and that each of us have our own personalities and strengths. Showing kindness helps us to understand each other and how we can work together to be the best version of ourselves. In return this motivates our teams to work collaboratively and inspire innovation.
In your experience, how does kindness make business sense?
The business world is becoming increasingly complex and changing at an exponential rate, and it is more critical than ever that firms can manage emerging risks and innovate for growth. And the research is overwhelmingly clear that the teams that do this the best are diverse teams.
By appreciating our differences and creating an inclusive environment where people are able to perform at their best, firms are more likely to see enhanced productivity, better ideas and sustained returns.
Can you give us one example of kindness in leadership making a significant impact?
At KPMG we have multiple networks that focus on gender, race and religion. These networks work together with the support from the people at KPMG to raise awareness of issues and challenges that are prominent in today’s world. Listening and making the effort to understand these issues has a significant impact on the way we work as a firm. It promotes collaboration, builds trust and improves retention of our top talent.

Matt Cooper

Co-Founder, Tandem Bank

Matt is the Co-founder of Tandem Bank, a ‘challenger bank’ helping to redefine the sector. Matt has also served (and in many cases, continues to serve) as non-executive chairman and/or director at a range of public and private companies, including: Octopus Investments; the National Centre for Circus Arts; Nottingham Trent University and the Mental Health Foundation. He was Principal Managing Director of Capital One (Europe), one of the world’s leading credit card companies. His ability to achieve results is awe-inspiring and, having worked across so many organisations, his impact is not limited to one team, indeed his leadership has affected countless individuals, organisations and industries. He is kind-hearted and generous with his time, advising founders and CEOs as well as those just starting their careers. He uses a combination of intelligence, business expertise and humanity to drive social change and impact – bettering the lives of others through the transformational organisations he supports and chairs. He is not afraid to question industries as a whole, and recently challenged the leader of the British venture capital industry to expand their investments into social impact. Matt’s unwavering support, openness and honesty has helped so many individuals and businesses thrive.

Why is kindness essential for a leader in today’s world?
I think of kindness as a combination of being honest and fair, and being compassionate with the ability to put oneself in the shoes of another. In the increasingly interconnected and fast-paced world we live in, this is harder than ever. We have so little time to get to know one another, that it takes a real effort, but these kind of relationships are what allows people and the organisations to which they belong to really thrive.

In your experience, how does kindness make business sense?
In order for businesses to thrive today, they need to be nimble. The old command and control paradigm, which I sometimes call leadership through fear, is too slow. People need to respect, and even love, their leaders, and need to be trusted to be autonomous in return. That kind of raptor shop stems from kindness and trust.

Can you give us one example of kindness in leadership making a significant impact?
The best example of kindness granted to me was when I left my job at Capital One in 2001. After 13 years, I had absolutely no idea what I wanted to do next. I began by talking to people that I knew, and gradually got referred to people further and further afield. I was amazed at how many people I’d never met were willing to spend time with me, and it was a huge help in planning my next step. Today I meet lots of people who are making major career changes, and I am always willing to spend time sharing my thoughts and experiences. As they say...what goes around comes around!

Louise Kingham OBE

CEO, The Energy Institute

Louise is Chief Executive of the Energy Institute, a chartered professional membership body bringing together global energy expertise. Whilst driving the institute’s objectives forward with the senior leadership team, staff and volunteers, Louise is also passionate about the Powerful Women initiative to advance gender diversity within the energy sector as a whole. She sits on the board of this initiative and, with her thoughtful leadership, drives the project forward in order to see other women excel. Louise leads by example, with compassion, trust and understanding. She allows her team to freely express their views, and listens and acts upon ideas wherever she can. Under Louise’s leadership, the institute has transformed from a traditional hierarchical and male-dominated structure, where bureaucracy slowed down decision making to an organisation that listens to its members, puts trust in its employees and thereby allows them to develop and take on responsibility. The Energy Institute is now a diverse and vibrant place to work, where communication and close relationships between different roles are encouraged and values such as integrity, forward thinking, know-how and collaboration are key.

 

Why is kindness essential for a leader in today’s world?
I think caring personally and showing that through kindness brings people together. In today’s world, it’s too easy to feel isolated from each other. An act of kindness, however small, can change that for a person, sometimes with far greater impact than intended.
In your experience, how does kindness make business sense?
By caring personally and showing kindness you recognise what’s important to others. That makes good business sense because it creates strong, loyal and committed relationships in business which are inevitably more productive.
Can you give us one example of kindness in leadership making a significant impact?
When people in my organisation have experienced personal trauma of different kinds, I have always shown kindness and looked for creative ways to support them. It’s important to treat people fairly and not flout your own rules, and being flexible and creative about managing someone through a difficult time also brings them back to your organisation at full speed more quickly. So kindness in leadership has a positive impact on the person and the organisation – an absolute win-win.

Liv Garfield

CEO, Severn Trent

Liv is the FTSE 100’s youngest female CEO in her current role as Chief Executive of Severn Trent, a water company serving 4.5 million homes and employing over 6,500 people. She is passionate about delivering major infrastructure projects and making a difference to social mobility, ensuring that Severn Trent is involved with education in schools and seen as a great place to work. Liv is not afraid to get involved in all aspects of the business and, a few days a week, she spends time out of the office, visiting sites including down the sewers. Prior to her work at Severn Trent, Liv was Head of Openreach. She believes that everyone deserves to know that their boss cares about them as a person and she does everything she can to ensure staff enjoy their work. Liv is also an inspirational role model and an advocate for inclusivity, believing that ‘the more that organisations can really go for inclusivity and thrive on more personalities and more difference, the better they will be’.

Why is kindness essential for a leader in today’s world?
I believe the role of a leader is to create the culture where every colleague can be the best they can possibly be. A culture that is based on inclusivity, kindness, meritocracy and integrity has the best chance of most people being able to shine.
In your experience, how does kindness make business sense?
People are a company’s greatest asset and more engaged people work harder for a company. Being treated with respect and kindness resonates with colleagues and makes them more likely to go the extra mile.
Can you give us one example of kindness in leadership making a significant impact?
We are all formed by a mix of personal and work experiences, moulded by behaviours of those around us and affected by key stand out events in our careers. Often those events are when someone intervened to support and develop us or put their reputation on the line to help promote us; quite simply a random act of kindness from one person can be a game changer for someone else. Perhaps through opening a door you never expected to walk through or providing a support network when there is a personal issue at home. I have certainly never forgotten the kindness, support and warmth I experienced from my old boss when my elder son was gravely ill in hospital.

Katie Lloyd

Development Director, News and Current Affairs, BBC

Katie joined the BBC in 2014 as Development Director in news and current affairs. She leads on a number of areas from leadership development to entry-level talent with a particular focus on diversity and culture. She has pioneered new initiatives such as the BBC News Women in Leadership programme; the Emerging Leaders programme and the under 30s panel. Katie also runs the pan-BBC outreach project, BBC School Report and has devised and launched the BBC’s recent work educating young people on how to identify ‘fake news’. Katie’s work has not only had a huge impact on the culture of her team and the division as a whole but it has also changed lives. She has transformed the culture of BBC News to be

more inclusive and creative; staff feel a sense of purpose and pride; diverse opinions are celebrated, and teams are more solutions focused.

Why is kindness essential for a leader in today’s world?
Kindness is essential in modern leadership. It helps to create a better working environment and unlock talent. It enables organisations to connect with their audiences and customers on a deeper level. The impact of this is a happier workforce and increased productivity. And the great news is it doesn’t cost anything.
Can you give us one example of kindness in leadership making a significant impact?
We all instinctively want to work for or with inspiring leaders. I’ve had the privilege of working with some incredible trailblazers throughout my career and the trait that has made the best stand out is undoubtedly their openness and generosity. The late great Dame Tessa Jowell was one of those leaders. She made time for people, truly listened and showed a great deal of empathy, all whilst being under immense scrutiny and holding down incredibly high pressure roles. I’m sure it was these skills that enabled her to bridge divides, operate across party political lines and bring people together in her work.

Kate Cheetham

Group General Counsel, Lloyds Banking Group

Kate is the Group General Counsel for Lloyds Banking Group. She sits on the executive committee and is responsible for advising the board and senior executives on legal matters. She is also Co-chair of Breakthrough, the women’s network at Lloyds Banking Group. Under her leadership, the network has grown from just a dozen engaged women to 15,000 members, making it the largest gender diversity network in the UK. She is a trustee of the Lloyds Bank Foundation for England and Wales; sponsor of Legal in the Community, and a supporter of the charity, Suited & Booted, which helps men who are out of work find employment. Kate has a proven track record of being an inspirational leader and has had a huge impact developing an inclusive culture. She is a positive agitator, always encouraging greater diversity across the business, and passionate about ensuring everybody has equal opportunities to succeed.

Why is kindness essential for a leader in today’s world?
I believe kindness is essential as a leader in today’s world because successful leadership is about people.
In your experience, how does kindness make business sense?
Operating in an authentic, caring manner, being respectful of others’ views and creating a supportive environment that enables everyone to contribute to the best of their ability, leads to more diverse thought and decision-making, better engagement and also better productivity, which can be a real differentiator in a challenging and competitive world.

Joanna McGrath

Managing Director, The Creative School

Joanna is the Founder of The Creative School, a company that helps school and university leavers and those looking for a career change to understand the ins and outs of agency life. Offering coaching and mentoring to support the leaders of tomorrow, The Creative School is the inside track for those starting out and it’s also importantly driving diversity in the industry. Joanna has over 20 years of agency experience, most recently as Managing Partner at BBH, where she headed up the Samsung account and an integrated team of 25. Prior to this, she was at Rufus Leonard where she moved from Account Director to Board Director in five years. Joanna’s greatest talent is the way in which she prioritises team happiness and manages to balance this with company productivity. She champions an empathetic style of leadership that puts her people and clients ahead of profit but she has managed to prove that this, in fact, serves the bottom line well. She led the more profitable side of the business at BBH for five years whilst cultivating the company’s happiest team. Joanna is never afraid to roll up her own sleeves; she’s ever cheerful; undaunted by any challenge, and unfailingly supportive of brave ideas and each member of her team.

Why is kindness essential for a leader in today’s world?
Kindness is such a human and personal quality. Today's world is so crazy busy and becoming more and more automated and so to demonstrate small kindnesses as a leader engenders loyalty – it shows you actually care about the people that work for you as people and not as a group of robots that 'perform work' for the company.
In your experience, how does kindness make business sense?
There is no business without people, and kindness in business reminds us that we're all human – an understanding of the day-to-day challenges for those on the ground and a nod to leaders being human too, even at the top! In an industry built on the strength of relationships, being kind to one another and understanding things from all sides garners greater collaboration and tightens relationships, which ultimately leads to greater authenticity, trust and clients wanting to work with us.
Can you give us one example of kindness in leadership making a significant impact?
I believe you have to look behind the eyes of the people you're leading. The way they perform, behave and interact with the team and clients is never just about work. The very best performance comes from people who feel you've got their back. Making sure people feel looked after at work allows them to focus their energy on being their best selves and doing the best job they can. When that happens on a big scale, the positive ripples are endless, company culture is strengthened, the work gets better and is delivered faster and the bottom line starts to grow.

Janet Coyle

Director Trade and Growth, London & Partners

Janet is the Director of Trade and Growth at London & Partners, the Mayor of London’s official promotional agency. She is also the Founder of the Silicon Valley Comes to the UK programme, a not-for-profit series of events that helps female founders from the US and London to support each other and grow their businesses. Janet works closely with City Hall on the ‘Behind Every Great City’ campaign to promote London’s female talent and has previously led the Mayor of London’s Business Programme during the Olympic and Paralympic Games in 2012. Janet is well-known and appreciated for the way in which she integrates kindness into her work and team. Under Janet’s leadership, her team receive excellent feedback on their trade delegations; they take time to listen to what entrepreneurs need to succeed and they are willing to go the extra mile to help these entrepreneurs and to develop long-lasting relationships. Janet’s leadership style sees her empowering all those who are lucky to work with her. Despite the heavy workload, she always prioritises her team and their well-being from clear and inspiring goals, regular communication and personal time with individuals of all levels to flexible working, finding work and development opportunities, and regular team/individual recognition.

Why is kindness essential for a leader in today’s world?
Kindness in leadership motivates individuals and helps to build strong teams with respect for each other.
In your experience, how does kindness make business sense?
If leaders display kindness, teams will feel more inspired and valued which will lead to greater productivity and success for the business. A happy, motivated team leads to a high performing team.

Can you give us one example of kindness in leadership making a significant impact?
One specific example is with the work I have done in leading Silicon Valley comes to the UK. I have often recruited volunteers and/or interns. At the very beginning I ask what their long term goals are so I can help them to develop the most appropriate skills and help to connect them with the right people. This has led to a number of the volunteers and interns moving on to secure full time roles using the experience they have gained on my project. Such volunteers have stayed in contact and offered to help with future projects as they feel loyal as a result of the kindness shown to them.

Jacqueline de Rojas CBE

President, techUK

Jacqueline is one of the UK’s most senior figures in tech. She is the President of techUK; a non executive director of Rightmove and the Costain Group; Chair of Digital Leaders and Co-chair of the Institute of Coding. Jacqueline is a strong advocate for the tech industry as a whole. As a leader, speaker and via her social media channels, she encourages behaviour within the community that is mutually supportive whether that be from one entrepreneur to another or from government and major corporates. She focuses on helping those in the tech world provide proactive and practical opportunities that encourage diversity within the ecosystem, or that use tech for good to tackle the global challenges of our time. Despite her own success, Jacqueline is all about supporting others; she is generous with her time, advising and mentoring, and uses her network to help others. Yes, she can be tough and honest, especially about where the tech community is falling short, but she does so in a way that is encouraging. Kindness is at the heart of how she finds this balance.

 

Why is kindness essential for a leader in today’s world?
I love the way that Amy Cuddy (TED Talk/Harvard Business School) articulated so eloquently that even before establishing their own credibility or competence, leaders who project warmth are more effective than people who lead with toughness. Basically, kindness and warmth appears to accelerate trust. I have come to recognise how true this is.
In your experience, how does kindness make business sense?
Let’s face it, it rarely matters how good the plan is. The key to achieving great outcomes is to build great relationships. From there you can bring a team together, inspire, uplift and motivate them. That’s why teams inspired by leaders who understand tolerance and inclusion achieve great things.
Can you give us one example of kindness in leadership making a significant impact?
I met the Dalai Lama two years ago and he shared this quote: ‘If you think you're too small to make a difference, try sleeping with a mosquito in the room.’ I love this reminder that the smallest actions can change the world. So, if I was to choose one thing that not just leaders but all of us can do to make a difference, it would be to focus on acknowledgment, celebration and recognition. My experience is that the number one reason for better results, better retention and better motivation is acknowledgement. It is almost always more effective than pay increases, training or being promoted. Celebrating is all about being kind, tolerant and generous and I believe that generosity matters.

Jackie Scully

Deputy Managing Director, Think

As the Deputy Managing Director of a successful publishing agency, Jackie has the respect and the admiration of every single member of staff working with her. She makes every day count there is a poster in the office that reads ‘Work hard and be nice to people’ and this reflects exactly what Jackie holds dear. From the small acts of kindness that see her baking cakes for staff birthdays and sharing in the highs and lows of life, to the way in which she acknowledges achievements, helps push individuals to do their very best or encourages everyone to take on a charity challenge, Jackie leads with kindness. Jackie explicitly understands the importance of a work-life balance. From a professional perspective, she’ll demonstrate this by identifying training opportunities for staff members so that there’s always extra support if needed, and on a personal level, flexible working is a given.

Why is kindness essential for a leader in today’s world?
Kindness in leadership has never been more important. Technology is reshaping job roles and creating new layers of complexity in the workplace. To navigate the unknowns and uncertainty, we must all travel with kindness together. Good leaders will get results. But great leaders will get results by getting the best out of people. And to get the best out of people you have to see – and actively look for – the best in people. That’s kindness in action.

In your experience, how does kindness make business sense?
Kindness and business are so compatible. Kindness leads to gratitude. Gratitude leads to loyalty and commitment. And commitment leads to improved performance and productivity. But, more than that, kindness breeds creativity. Create an environment where people feel there are no wrong answers and you’ll be surprised to see the ideas that follow. Praise someone for their strengths and they will reward you by getting even stronger. If you genuinely want – and encourage – people to thrive, your organisation will thrive. And, you’ll feel great in the process.

Can you give us one example of kindness in leadership making a significant impact?
Kindness doesn’t often make the headlines. People are not quick to celebrate the leaders that choose praise over progress at all costs. But they should. Samia al Qadhi is one such leader. As CEO of Breast Cancer Care, she has successfully created a culture of collaboration and made health and happiness a business priority. And, CEO of RICS, Sean Tompkins, is a man you should all meet. Hear him speak about his decision to run an organisation that changes lives by transforming the built environment and you will be inspired. Then listen to the women who have forged successful careers because he has championed diversity in a male-dominated profession and you will learn the true definition of kindness in leadership. When the currency is kindness, we are all millionaires.

Guillermo Donadini

Chief Investment Officer for APAC, EMEA & LATAM, AIG

Guillermo is the Chief Investment Officer for AIG, the biggest insurer in the world. Earlier this year, his team won the highest honours at the Insurance Investment Exchange Awards – the Best General Insurer award. He is a dedicated executive sponsor and contributor to the work of the Women & Allies UK ERG, and a member of the UK ExCo. Guillermo has awoken consciousness around gender, diversity and inclusion, and sparked important conversations and initiatives. His openness about his own mental health has changed lives, encouraging greater awareness, transparency and support for those who need to seek help. Most importantly, he has established internal mentoring and is always inviting others to develop their emotional intelligence, ensuring a better managerial culture.

Why is kindness essential for a leader in today’s world?
Kindness is an attribute that elevates those around you by giving them attention and respect, both key foundations for a long-term, trust-based relationship.
In your experience, how does kindness make business sense?
The quality of human relationships is the most important factor in the current business environment, where flexibility, collaboration and a diversity of ideas are key for success.
Can you give us one example of kindness in leadership making a significant impact?
Have you ever asked your team for help? If you did, you know what I am talking about. If you didn’t, try next time and enjoy the difference.

Gillian Charlesworth

Director of Regulatory and Corporate Affairs, RICS

Gillian is Director of Regulatory and Corporate Affairs and a member of the executive team at the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS). RICS is the global professional body promoting and enforcing the highest international standards in the valuation, management and development of land, real estate, construction and infrastructure. With 125,000 members globally, and nearly a thousand employees, Gillian has a significant influence over many professionals, directly and indirectly. Working in collaboration with the executive team and other key players in the industry, Gillian is changing the image of the profession to one that is much more inclusive. Under her leaderships, RICS has enjoyed greater engagement from its members. She has also set up a Women of the Future network, consisting of the finalists from the real estate, infrastructure and construction category at the Women of the Future Awards. This network has empowered and coached women through the leadership pipeline and encouraged more women into the industry as a whole.

Why is kindness essential for a leader in today’s world?
If our world is not going to become ever more divided, we need leaders who care about people and act as role models in treating all with respect. With political leaders failing in this, business leaders can show the way and lead a shift in our culture
In your experience, how does kindness make business sense?
Leading with kindness, including respect, honesty and fairness, motivates people every day to do their best and strive for results, producing long-term success for both organisations and individuals.
Can you give us one example of kindness in leadership making a significant impact?
Sacha Romanovitch, until recently CEO of Grant Thornton, stands out as a beacon of fairness, equality and respect – key components of kindness. Ultimately, she was forced out of her role but has made a mark for kind business leadership which will have a lasting impact.

Gareth Southgate

Manager, England National Football Team

Since 2016, Gareth has been the Manager of the England national football team. Prior to this role, he served as Manager of Middlesbrough from 20062009 and Manager of the England U21 team from 20132016. Earlier this year at the 2018 FIFA World Cup, he became the third manager to reach a World Cup semi-final. Gareth knows only too well what it is like to be a player too. He enjoyed more than 500 league appearances, playing as a defender and midfielder for Aston Villa, Middlesbrough and Crystal Palace, as well as playing for the English team 57 times. Gareth has been credited for transforming the country’s relationship with its football team and demonstrating an ability to influence people far beyond the sport itself. Gareth is known for listening and learning from his players and, rather than ‘managing’, he leads with a calm, confident and quietly understated style a style that is certainly delivering results.

No Question found!

Emma Sergeant

Europe President, DAS Group of Companies, Omnicom

Emma is incredibly senior within the DAS Group as the President of Europe. Her role is multifaceted and sees her working with both clients and agencies. She is a former Chair of Omniwomen UK, a diversity and inclusion initiative within Omnicom that aims to promote more women into leadership roles within the organisation, and she now sits on the global steering committee for Omniwomen. She is incredibly inclusive in her leadership; always finding time for others despite her busy schedule, and she drives the culture that she wants to see in her agencies. She is known for bringing the best out of people and allowing them to shine, and is well regarded throughout the world for her kindness, empathy and professionalism.

Why is kindness essential for a leader in today’s world?
At a time of increasing complexity, insecurity and change the wellbeing of the modern workforce is an ever more important part of business success. Kindness in a leadership position is not only the right way to behave but it also leads to trust, respect, loyalty and people feeling valued
In your experience, how does kindness make business sense?
Kindness in business is rewarded by reciprocal employee behaviour. It creates an open culture where people can connect and innovate, which is essential when business is moving at speed. There is a particular challenge with the millennial workforce often mistrusting corporations, needing authentic leadership and having the desire to move jobs frequently. At the same time corporations need talent, fresh thinking and stability in the workforce. Kindness from the top can help to engage employees in the right way so that business can be built and grow from mutual understanding and appreciation.
Can you give us one example of kindness in leadership making a significant impact?
I originally trained as a paediatric nurse. As a very young student nurse I was upset and frightened at the time of a child’s death. The nursing Sister sensed my fear and apprehension and ‘took me by the hand’ , showing me how to respect death with dignity and kindness, especially when breaking bad news to the family. That leadership lesson taught me how to; take time for junior staff and the value senior support can bring, at a time of stress and uncertainty the importance of being calm, that small gestures and thoughtful

Doug Wills

Managing Editor, The Evening Standard and The Independent

Doug is Managing Editor of the Evening Standard and The Independent. His role involves working closely with editorial executives and dealing daily with circulation, advertising and production directors, co-ordinating the complex operation of producing daily newspapers and their editorial digital channels. More than 900,000 copies of the Evening Standard are distributed every afternoon and its fast-expanding digital platforms exceed 11 million readers a month. Doug is passionate about the industry but it is always his team who he puts first. He is generous with his time, whether it be work experience students arriving for a day or long-term colleagues who he supports above all else, through thick and thin. He gets behind so many of the papers’ campaigns such as running the London Marathon earlier this year to raise much-needed funds for the Felix Project, the official charity of the Evening Standard’s ‘Help A Hungry Child’ appeal. He is also a trustee of the charity, Inspiring Girls International.

In your experience, how does kindness make business sense?
Companies have to make hard decisions, sometimes unpalatable ones. If the hardest decision is made with sensitivity, this will make all the difference to the individuals involved. It will also be appreciated by friends and colleagues. Bad news travels fast, but kindness is remembered longer, often shared… and all of us try to pay back kindness when the opportunity arises.

Dereka Symes

Finance Director, Ground Control

Following on stellar careers at Arthur Andersen and Field and Trek, Dereka joined Ground Control in 2008 as Finance Director, where she is an invaluable member of both the executive team and the board of directors. She directly manages over 30 finance professionals and is part of the senior team leading 1,100 employees and over 5,000 subcontracted operatives throughout the UK. Dereka has been instrumental in the business growth from £42m to £140m over the past ten years. She is a superb protector and advocate of Ground Control’s unique culture of putting people at the heart of its business Ground Control is known for the calibre of people it is able to recruit, develop and retain and it has been recognised by the likes of the London Stock Exchange as one of the top 1000 Inspiring Businesses as well as numerous other industry and national awards for excellence. Dereka acts with kindness and collaboration in all interactions with staff, colleagues, suppliers and clients. She is immensely generous with her time and compassion and it’s easy to see the results of her leadership style. As one example, it’s because of her genuine warmth and care for others that she’s been especially effective in connecting with and integrating key staff in the four companies that have been acquired by Ground Control in recent years.

Why is kindness essential for a leader in today’s world?
Humanity is a most important quality. Without it, what are we? Hope for the future lies in leaders caring about the environment, our world, and people rather than power.
In your experience, how does kindness make business sense?
Being kind has a powerful effect, kindness is motivating. If you care about employees and treat them well, they will work hard, have pride in their work and care about their team and company. Happy people are productive people. If you look out for people, they will look out for you.
Can you give us one example of kindness in leadership making a significant impact?
Gandhi was a transformational, motivational and compassionate leader. His non-violent protests had a far-reaching impact in the fight against racial oppression in South Africa and the Indian Independence movement. Among many insightful quotes: ‘Where there is love there is life,’ and ‘...in a gentle way, you can shake the world’.

Darren Tierney

Director of Strategy, Department for International Trade

Darren is a senior civil servant, leading the Department of Trade’s ministerial strategy directorate. His team supports ministers in setting and articulating the department’s strategy, helping to ensure that activities are coordinated, connected across Whitehall, and in line with the overall vision. Darren makes a deliberate effort to encourage a culture of openness, fairness and kindness within his team. He encourages people to bring their ‘whole self’ to work, and he has an open door policy where staff are welcome to approach him with problems, ideas or questions at anytime. This working environment has helped his team achieve some of the highest engagement scores in the Department of International Trade. Darren has an ability to make all members of his directorate feel valued. He has shown a commitment to increasing diversity within the department, being a visible champion for the department’s apprenticeship scheme and the LGBTI+ network. His senior level sponsorship of these schemes and networks has helped drive their success.

Why is kindness essential for a leader in today’s world?
If we want people to trust us – staff, clients, stakeholders – projecting warmth and kindness can accelerate that. I see this as especially true in the complex systems we manage in the Civil Service. The hard-edged benefits of an engaged workforce can be easily underpinned by kindness. It obviously isn’t the only trait that we want to project, but it is often overlooked – and it is powerful.
In your experience, how does kindness make business sense?
We know that highly engaged staff are more productive; that making the office a great place to work affects the bottom line and productivity, and that relationships with peers or clients built on trust are more sustainable, especially when things get tricky. Kindness – be that purposeful or random acts – can be a great way to achieve this.
Can you give us one example of kindness in leadership making a significant impact?
Kindness in tough situations can be particularly important, and impactful. After a particularly torrid crisis when I worked in a Minister’s private office, my then boss took me and a Special Adviser out to lunch at the end of the week. A simple act, but she intervened to thank us both for managing the issue and to make sure we were OK. We were all exceptionally busy – so taking an hour out wasn’t trivial, but it was worthwhile. I came back to work feeling better, and more motivated to carry on.

Dame Sue Owen

Permanent Secretary, Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport

Dame Sue is responsible for the overall management and leadership of the department for digital, culture, media and sport (DCMS), leading DCMS civil servants to ensure the arts, sport, tourism, digital, media and creative industries contribute to economic growth. Projects include promoting Britain all over the world and delivering major initiates such as broadband rollout; a legacy from the 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games, and a series of events to mark the centenary of the First World War. Dame Sue is also the Civil Service Diversity & Inclusion Champion and LGB&TI Champion. Since taking on the role in 2013, Dame Sue has fostered an inclusive, encouraging, dynamic and ‘can do’ atmosphere at DCMS. She’s approachable, always encouraging learning and development as well as new ideas from staff, no matter their rank. She personally mentors staff despite all the time pressures she is under and goes above and beyond to fight for her department and employees so that they have the best opportunities, working conditions and knowledge to do their jobs well.

Why is kindness essential for a leader in today’s world?
Because it fosters an inclusive culture where people feel valued
In your experience, how does kindness make business sense?
If people are valued they perform better
Can you give us one example of kindness in leadership making a significant impact?
In DCMS it has led to a reduction in bullying and harassment and a rise in staff engagement

Dame Joan Stringer CBE

Non-Executive Director and Chair

Dame Joan is a seasoned and strategic CEO, chair and non-executive director with a breadth of experience across different sectors. She has held senior roles in higher education for 25 years, most recently as Principal and Vice Chancellor of Edinburgh Napier University, and she currently holds a range of board appointments across the private, arts and not-for-profit sectors. She also undertakes advisory and consultancy work in change management, strategy development and governance. She has contributed to a wide range of public policy developments in Scotland, the UK and overseas and has successfully led change in complex environments. She is passionate about the transformational power of education and has actively promoted widening access to higher education. Dame Joan is consistently respectful and clear in her interactions with everyone she encounters, always treating colleagues with dignity and kindness and thereby creating a nurturing and supportive platform which brings out the best in people and organisations.

Why is kindness essential for a leader in today’s world?
Kindness unites and heals and is all the more important in a world that is divided and all too often inhumane. Kindness in leaders is not seen as weakness but strength.
In your experience, how does kindness make business sense?
Kindness and respect as core values in any organisation will be returned by loyalty, support and greater likelihood of success.

Chris Southam

Consultant, MROI

Chris’s initial career saw her pave the way to become a main board member of the billion pound retailer, Otto UK. With first-hand experience of running such a large commercial organisation, Chris then moved into the executive coaching space, initially setting-up her own coaching company and subsequently joining MROI. Her vast experience means that she is well placed to coach top talent in all aspects of career and personal development and it is this coaching and her leadership which has had such a significant impact over the years on so many. She has a unique skill – she is able to help clients and colleagues think deeper, gain confidence in their own abilities and thrive. Over and above all else, Chris is incredibly generous with her time, network and insights, always willing to give so that others can fulfil their own potential.

Why is kindness essential for a leader in today’s world?
Both our world and our time available have shrunk dramatically as communication has escalated to levels we couldn’t possibly have imagined.
With less time to make decisions we all employ standard business filters to make those decisions and choices - will it be profitable?, will it add value?, will it impact stakeholders ?etc etc Maybe adding 'Is this a kind action’ as our primary filter, we will create a virtuous chain reaction. If it is kind in the first instance, it is very likely that good will follow for all outcomes.
The kindness filter is an essential leadership tool.
In your experience, how does kindness make business sense?
If kindness makes sense in our everyday world, it must follow that the same is true in business - there is no distinction and that realisation is key to a more holistic approach to transacting.
Why would we be harsher, tougher, less lenient or even unjoyful in our business interactions.?It makes no sense!
If we operate as our true selves and not some distorted ‘business’ version of ourself we will become liberated and amazed at the kindness chain reaction that our true selves unlock.
It takes less time to be kind - no complicated layered filtering.
It promotes a virtuous chain reaction.
It can be both an individual and a collective ‘sign up’ - kind Boards will bring rapid change to their businesses. Their actions will send ‘kind waves’ through their organisations.
Everyone will be happy in the knowledge that they have been guided in their actions form the most noble of instincts.
Why wouldn’t you be kind first!
Can you give us one example of kindness in leadership making a significant impact?
A CEO of a large retailer was making a tour of the warehouse; as she sat in the canteen for a lunch break, she noticed that one of the security team who was also taking a break, was rapidly filling in a very difficult cryptic crossword. They got chatting and she learned that the security guard was working shifts that were not helpful to his domestic arrangements and so with the kindness filter flashing the CEO thought about trying to improve the situation for him. She knew that she should think about all the practical reasons for not getting involved ( best use of her time, HR implications etc etc) but kindness won the day and the guard was soon running a complex operation in the import arm of the business which contributed to the company winning an award for services to enterprise.

Charlotte Hogg

Chief Executive Officer, Visa Europe

Charlotte joined Visa as CEO of Europe in 2017, bringing with her 25 years of experience in financial services, bank operations and management consulting. She is an executive sponsor of Visa’s Young Professionals Group and a mentor for the Visa Mentoring Programme. She is also incredibly supportive of the work carried out by the employee communications and experience team. Charlotte places huge importance on employee well-being and personal development, believing that everyone has a valuable voice from the leadership team to the most junior level. She is acutely aware of the stresses of the job and the challenge to balance work and home life. She also supports Now Teach, an organisation that exists to help those who’ve already made a success of one profession to retrain as teachers.

Why is kindness essential for a leader in today’s world?
Organisations are made up of people, and we all tend to do our best work when we feel valued and recognised by the people around us. We need to feel our contributions make a difference and that we are understood. How can that happen without thoughtfulness and a desire to help and support colleagues?
In your experience, how does kindness make business sense?
Our world is changing fast and we need to be able to respond fast. To do that, we need to be confident in bringing our real selves to work. We are more likely to do so in an environment that is kind and thoughtful. All businesses also have customers and customers readily pick up on the values of an institution. They know that if we are kind to each other, we will be kind to them. That doesn’t mean uncommercial – it means that we treat each other with thoughtfulness and respect.
Can you give us one example of kindness in leadership making a significant impact?
How we help colleagues work through situations in their lives which will naturally impact their work is always the test. Attitudes towards an employer are shaped by moments of truth – how we act when they suffer a bereavement, physical or mental illness or any crisis with family or friends – these moments will be remembered and either create greater loyalty or a sense of separation.

Bronagh Kennedy

Group Company Secretary and Chief Counsel, Severn Trent

Bronagh is Chief Counsel and Company Secretary at Severn Trent, the second largest water company in the UK. She heads up the social responsibility committee and, in her current role, is uniquely placed to impact culture, shape the company’s values and ensure focus is placed on the matters that mean the most to staff and customers. She is renowned for her warmth and desire to do the right thing and she has created an incredibly supportive and personally fulfilling culture within the organisation as a whole, evidenced by a score of 94% on the company wide anonymous engagement survey. Bronagh cares for every member of her team, investing time in their well-being, mental health, career development, and work-life balance management. Under her leadership, Severn Trent enjoys a culture that encourages proactive random acts of kindness, something which people thrive on.

In your experience, how does kindness make business sense?
In my experience kindness makes good business sense because people may join a business, but they tend to leave their boss. Kindness in business leaders is very much a USP (unique selling point) in an increasingly transactional world. It drives genuine employee engagement, retention, loyalty and productivity.

Bill Skelly

Chief Constable, Lincolnshire Police

Bill has clearly defined well-being as one of the top three priorities for Lincolnshire Police, seeking to improve physical, mental and spiritual well-being within the organisation. Under his leadership, a range of initiatives to improve staff well-being has been introduced, including providing all staff with two days well-being leave per year; additional psychological support; the employment of fitness mentors, and a change to how pay reductions for long term sickness are reviewed. Bill believes that this care is key to achieving an effective police force; he may not be able to change the level of risk his force face on a daily basis but he can provide support that helps them reduce the personal impact. Bill’s compassionate leadership has resulted in an 800% increase in pastoral care provision for officers and staff in times of crisis.

Why is kindness essential for a leader in today’s world?
The behaviour of a leader is reflected in their organisation. Modern leadership is not built on conflict and criticism; organisations that behave this way inevitably fail, causing great pain along the way. Being considerate, compassionate and generous in spirit towards your people will be displayed in their kindness to each other; such organisations are destined for success, bringing great joy along the way.
In your experience, how does kindness make business sense?
It is a very simple belief: good people, who feel good about themselves, will do good work. A leadership exhibiting kindness, supports and encourages people to feel good about their place in an organisation that truly cares for them. In turn, they pass on this goodwill to the customers they serve, building positive experiences that grow the business.
Can you give us one example of kindness in leadership making a significant impact?
I gave the people in my organisation permission to take some time for themselves. The well-being days (two per person, per year) have been positively received with thousands being used since their introduction. As the wife of one of my Detective Sergeants told me – ‘he works too hard, even on holiday, but you have given him back to us as a family for two precious days and it has made all the difference’.

Bill Marley

CEO, The Employability Trust

Bill founded The Employability Trust in East Durham in 2011, with the aim to help the unemployed into work, and also to provide a reliable, committed, employable workforce for local manufacturers. Initially, he worked alone to set up the organisation, with a board of part-time trustees, funding much of it himself and using the relationships he had made in industry over his many years of employment to support him. He now has a team and has helped so many unemployed people, of every age to find work, self-esteem and dignity. In recent years, the Trust has also taken on manufacturing work for prestigious clients. Bill treats every person who comes to the Trust with respect and consideration, whether they are a visiting MP, a 40 year old who has never had a job or a young adult with literacy problems. Bill creates an environment where team members can be courageous and try new things. For many, it’s the first time in their lives that they are not found wanting; they are encouraged, nurtured and allowed to shine.

Why is kindness essential for a leader in today’s world?
Kindness is the foundation for building a progressive business culture
Can you give us one example of kindness in leadership making a significant impact?
For three years, we supported a housebound young man suffering from eczema and severe depression. It was kindness, not just from one person, but from the entire team that has enabled this individual to secure sustainable employment and to become a confident and enthusiastic young person.

Anya Hindmarch CBE

Founder and Creative Director, Anya Hindmarch London

Anya is the Founder, Chairman and Creative Director of the brand Anya Hindmarch, London. She started the brand in 1987 at the age of 19 and now has over 30 stores worldwide. She is involved in the daily management of the business and is a passionate advocate of British design and the arts. She is also a UK Trade Ambassador, a Non Executive Director of the British Fashion Council, and a trustee of the Royal Academy of Arts and the Design Museum. Anya carries the torch of success for the brand and is well known for her leadership style that sees her weave kindness into every interaction along with patience and a sense of calm. She has developed campaigns that have had a significant positive global impact, for example in 2007 she created the successful environmental project called ‘I am Not a Plastic Bag’. In 2011, she created a designer T-shirt in aid of the victims of the devastating Japan tsunami, and earlier this year she completed a public design project in London which saw giant heart balloons suspended over famous landmarks across the city.

 

Why is kindness essential for a leader in today’s world?
Kindness is a fundamental part of creating an atmosphere in which people can work happily and thrive. If there is a culture of respect, inclusiveness and collaboration, anything is possible.
In your experience, how does kindness make business sense?
Why waste all the good energy fighting or being negative inside the business? It’s better to be joined-up internally and battle the world for customers!
Can you give us one example of kindness in leadership making a significant impact?
I believe in the favour bank… you ‘pay in’ throughout your career by looking after people and doing things for which there may be no return. However, I suspect that if you ever need the favour bank to pay out, your credit will stand you in good stead. I have had numerous examples of this so I know it works.

Anne Richards

CEO, Fidelity International

Anne is one of the most influential women in European finance and is currently serving as Chief Executive of Fidelity International. Prior to taking on this role she was Chief Executive of M&G Investments and also held senior roles at JP Morgan Investment Management, Mercury Asset Management and Aberdeen Asset Management. Anne is determined to improve diversity in the male-dominated world of finance and she has been credited as being a driving force in the industry, heading-up many initiatives including Aberdeen’s Back to Boardroom scheme which builds networks to help female talent thrive. Anne is also a member of the US-based 2020 Women on Boards, which aims to raise the percentage of women on corporate boards in the US to 20% or greater by the year 2020. In 2015, Anne was awarded a CBE for her services to the industry.

Why is kindness essential for a leader in today’s world?
The old view of leadership, that kindness is something which demonstrates weakness, is out of date and out of touch. The behaviour of leaders sets the tone for the culture of the entire organisation. Kindness helps to create connections that cut through the hierarchies; puts the firm’s values into practice, and rallies employees around achieving business goals.
In your experience, how does kindness make business sense?
In a world when attracting and retaining the best available talent can provide a significant competitive edge, it is vital to achieve high levels of employee engagement. Creating a positive and supportive culture plays a major role in achieving this and kindness is at its heart.
Can you give us one example of kindness in leadership making a significant impact?

Andy Marsh

Chief Constable, Avon and Somerset Constabulary

Andy is the Chief Constable of Avon and Somerset Constabulary. He is the highest ranking officer in a police force with over 5,000 employees. Andy’s role is to lead the force and provide strategic oversight and leadership. Andy took on the role of Chief Constable in 2016 and was met with a force that had experienced a period of turbulence with five previous Chief Constables in four years. Morale was low and trust in the community needed to be rebuilt. Andy set the standard from the beginning. With his passion for empowerment, development, relationship building and honesty, Andy was able to simultaneously rebuild the confidence of the community and recover officer and staff morale. His commitment to health and well-being is most notable and the fact that he personally chairs the force’s Health and Wellbeing Board is an example of this. In a hierarchical organisation that is bound by rank and has historic memories of authoritative leadership, Andy’s innovative outlook is indicative of the future of modern policing. He is a truly inspirational leader.

 

Why is kindness essential for a leader in today’s world?
In policing, officers and staff often have contact with people in crisis. Sometimes these people are having the worst day of their lives. They may have lost a loved one, be reporting someone missing or have been a victim of crime. I know from the hundreds of letters of thanks I receive that my officers and staff extend kindness to these people and go the extra mile to provide outstanding policing services to make things better. From a leadership perspective, if we want and need our people to be outstanding and give their all, then that kindness starts inside our organisation, in teams and in leaders.
In your experience, how does kindness make business sense?
Policing isn’t simply a job, it’s ‘the job’ and it isn’t a profession that can be picked up and learnt quickly. It takes years of experience and learning and, if we want to keep people in this most challenging of careers, where they face uncertainty, ambiguity, and emotional and physical challenges, then we need to create an environment where they can flourish and grow. In this perspective, kindness and caring are the ultimate professional advantage.

Can you give us one example of kindness in leadership making a significant impact?
My role is to set the direction, to lead by example and celebrate the work of others. I’m encouraged greatly by the kindness I see across the constabulary and this is, no doubt, inspired by leadership.

Becky Tipper is a Communications Centre Manager at Avon and Somerset Police and shows immense kindness and fairness, which is recognised across the constabulary. Becky adopts an open and honest leadership style and shares past experiences and vulnerabilities to encourage others to do the same. She was approached by a team member who was involved in an abusive relationship and required support. The woman felt confident that her disclosure to Becky would be met with kindness and understanding. Becky supported her colleague throughout this difficult time and the woman went on to share her own story, with peers and the public, to raise awareness and to help others in similar situations. This is a fantastic example of how kindness in leadership can lead to empowerment that extends beyond a work environment.

Anastasia Ellis

Head of EMEA Television, Bloomberg

Anastasia runs the television channel for the EMEA region for Bloomberg. She joined Bloomberg in 2000 and since then has worked as a field producer, editor, executive producer for interviews and managing editor for television. Within an organisation that is constantly changing, Anastasia is an anchor. Her longevity at the firm, coupled with her network of strong relationships, instills strength and confidence. Her ability to identify, nurture and retain talent makes her an inspiration and a role model. Anastasia cultivates a personal relationship with her direct reports which enables them to have an easy line of communication with her. As someone you can confide in with both personal issues and career aspirations, Anastasia has helped create a culture of trust that has improved employee mental health and well-being and, in turn, productivity.

Why is kindness essential for a leader in today’s world?
While helping people grow and reach their potential is a personal honor, but it also makes them a better employee. Kindness creates loyalty, which produces better employees for our company and that in turn increases productivity,both individually and for the team as a whole. This also inspires a positive cycle, when my employees become manages themselves, the same ethos has been ingrained and the ecosystem grows.
In your experience, how does kindness make business sense?
While for many companies and in my field, newsrooms, bottom lines and breaking news are critical to survival. In my experiences, I found that kindness has always propelled people further and in turn made better results. Especially in a newsroom environment, where it is very competitive both internally and with your external peers, creating a safe environment for everyone on the team to be heard, has meant that more ideas are generated, sources contacted and the group effort prevails over the individual. This creates a work place that attracts the best in the business, and an environment where every person feel valued and willing to put in extra hours and energy.

While helping people grow and reach their potential is a personal honor, but it also makes them a better employee. Kindness creates loyalty, which produces better employees for our company and that in turn increases productivity,both individually and for the team as a whole. This also inspires a positive cycle, when my employees become manages themselves, the same ethos has been ingrained and the ecosystem grows.

Aimie Chapple

Non Executive Director, Consultant and Board Advisor

Aimie recently retired from Accenture where she worked for 25 years and most recently served as Senior Managing Director. She also served on the Accenture’s UK and Ireland executive board as Chief Innovation Officer and led the health business. Aimie has worked with large client organisations in the US, Europe and Asia, planning and implementing large-scale change programmes. Since leaving Accenture, she has taken up non-executive roles with two organisations on the FTSE Aim All-Share Index and continues to be a leading light within the health and tech sectors. Aimee is well known as an authentic and kind leader, from the little things she does to make everyone feel welcome and appreciated to the way in which her legacy lives on at Accenture she is widely applauded as having created a ‘ripple effect’ with leaders within the company acknowledging that she has given them permission to make kindness part of their own leadership DNA. Throughout her 25 year career at Accenture, Aimie touched the lives of thousands, at every level within the organisation, helping so many to shine and to be the leaders they are today.

Why is kindness essential for a leader in today’s world?
Leaders have a responsibility to make time for and have empathy with the people they lead. For me, kindness is synonymous with honesty delivered with that empathy to help people stretch, grow and find their potential.
In your experience, how does kindness make business sense?
The world moves at quite a pace and when leaders lead with kindness – that combination of honesty and empathy – it allows business to match the pace of their consumers and leverage the strengths within their teams and the business at large.
Can you give us one example of kindness in leadership making a significant impact?
I have felt it at times from others, and I know I have worked hard to be that type of leader. Personally, it has allowed me to step into new challenges and at the same time face some pretty tough context in my life at different times. This is the leadership I try to provide to the people I work with – an empathy for them and their lives, whilst also challenging them, stretching them and seeing what they can do despite some of the wider context that often makes showing up at work challenging.